Three women come in at about four in the afternoon looking for a tea leaf reading. They leave after Castiel breaks the third cup of tea in his hands, after a fire lights spontaneously in the fireplace and a crystal spins off of a string in the window and drives itself half an inch into the wall. He apologizes profusely; they pay half price and leave giggling, thanking him for a good show.
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glamstructed:

fat-birds:

Budgie Balancing Trick.

thank you, friend

(Source: fat-birds)

i’m about to hit 1900 followers

(eleven away actually)

is anyone interested in prompting me with something they’d like to see 1900 words of

yoooo skim milk is great though, i can’t drink whole milk or anything heavier than skim because it’s too hard on my stomach but with skim milk i still get to drink milk without having to resort to other shit :p

i can handle milk that’s been like, cooked and is like, presented with other foods but i can’t drink a glass/eat a bowl of cereal of any kind of milk at all.

butterfat is like the reason why i get up in the morning and like, when i cook with milk, i like to use 2% and when I make cheese i use whole milk or goat’s milk and when we make our butter we use cream and then use the buttermilk for biscuits and skim milk isn’t heavy enough to stand up to be cooked with and used in sauces and stuff because it’s mostly water with stuff in instead of an amalgamation of water and fat with stuff in

i’m sorry you can’t drink heavier stuff; i’m glad it works for you! 

of course u wouldn’t like white food… reverse racist….

what am i going to do when you move away 

things i have no time for

  • willful ignorance
  • white power bullshit
  • tofu
  • skim milk.
aximili:

Every time I see Elizabeth i’s signature I get absurdly happy cause I just imagine her signing her name and doing a little twirly and then pausing and then adding a few more twirlies “your majesty perhaps thats enough twirls” suggests William Cecil “perhaps Im the motherfuckin queen” suggests elizabeth and adds 6 more

aximili:

Every time I see Elizabeth i’s signature I get absurdly happy cause I just imagine her signing her name and doing a little twirly and then pausing and then adding a few more twirlies
“your majesty perhaps thats enough twirls” suggests William Cecil
“perhaps Im the motherfuckin queen” suggests elizabeth and adds 6 more

guldentusks:

bullie-barista-of-indeterminate-gender-currently-nicknamed-dragon doodles

because i found some and ultra vivid scene put me in a coffee shop dawgs mood

Anonymous asked: So it's OK to steal something from other cultures? I mean, as long as your country did not fuck up their country recently.

The power relation between the US and Scandinavia isn’t the same as the power relation between the US and South Asia, Asia, and Native Peoples. We do not actively look to Scandinavia to see the other in the United States and other western countries; we look to Scandinavia to see ourselves. We do not use Thor to make Scandinavia as an exotic other or to sexualize ourselves in the vestments of another place; we do not use Thor as a way to make objects and commodities of real people. When white women wear an eagle-feather headdress or a sari or when people who aren’t Jewish wear a Star of David, it is a member of a culturally dominant, oppressing group turning to an active site of memory to make a fashion statement. It is using cultural touchstones removed from their contexts as objects that signify the exotic. 

Norse mythology also isn’t worshiped by a significant population inside of Scandinavia right now- it’s regarded far more as something inside of a folkloric memory instead of holy religious discourse. The people outside of Scandinavia that hold the old Norse gods religiously like use them as symbols of white supremacy and power. If I were you, I’d be a lot more angry about that.

Anonymous asked: Do you think Marvel!Thor is cultural appropriation?

Nope. I don’t think Norse myth is an active site of memory or oppression.

Society often blurs the lines between drag queens and trans women. This is highly problematic, because many people believe that, like drag queens, trans women go home, take off their wigs and chest plates, and walk around as men. Trans womanhood is not a performance or costume.

whatthefauna:

I can only assume that what photographer Porsupah Ree captured here are binkying bunnies. A binky is a playful and happy expression made by a rabbit in which it jumps in the air and twists its body around in a convulsive fashion.

(Source: 500px.com)

A white girl wore a bindi at Coachella. And, then my social media feeds went berserk. Hashtagging the term “cultural appropriation” follows the outrage and seems to justify it at the same time. Except that it doesn’t.

Cultural appropriation is the adoption of a specific part of one culture by another cultural group. As I (an Indian) sit here, eating my sushi dinner (Japanese) and drinking tea (Chinese), wearing denim jeans (American), and overhearing Brahm’s Lullaby (German) from the baby’s room, I can’t help but think what’s the big deal?

The big deal with cultural appropriation is when the new adoption is void of the significance that it was supposed to have — it strips the religious, historical and cultural context of something and makes it mass-marketable. That’s pretty offensive. The truth is, I wouldn’t be on this side of the debate if we were talking about Native American headdresses, or tattoos of Polynesian tribal iconography, Chinese characters or Celtic bands.

Why shouldn’t the bindi warrant the same kind of response as the other cultural symbols I’ve listed, you ask? Because most South Asians won’t be able to tell you the religious significance of a bindi. Of my informal survey of 50 Hindu women, not one could accurately explain it’s history, religious or spiritual significance. I had to Google it myself, and I’ve been wearing one since before I could walk.

We can’t accuse non-Hindus of turning the bindi into a fashion accessory with little religious meaning because, well, we’ve already done that. We did it long before Vanessa Hudgens in Coachella 2014, long before Selena Gomez at the MTV Awards in 2013, and even before Gwen Stefani in the mid-90s.

Indian statesman Rajan Zed justifies the opposing view as he explains, “[The bindi] is an auspicious religious and spiritual symbol… It is not meant to be thrown around loosely for seductive effects or as a fashion accessory…” If us Indians had preserved the sanctity and holiness of the bindi, Zed’s argument for cultural appropriation would have been airtight. But, the reality is, we haven’t.

The 5,000 year old tradition of adorning my forehead with kumkum just doesn’t seem to align with the current bindi collection in my dresser — the 10-pack, crystal-encrusted, multi-colored stick-on bindis that have been designed to perfectly compliment my outfit. I didn’t happen to pick up these modern-day bindis at a hyper-hipster spot near my new home in California. No. This lot was brought from the motherland itself.

And, that’s just it. Culture evolves. Indians appreciated the beauty of a bindi and brought it into the world of fashion several decades ago. The single red dot that once was, transformed into a multitude of colors and shapes embellished with all the glitz and glamor that is inherent in Bollywood. I don’t recall an uproar when Indian actress Madhuri Dixit’s bindi was no longer a traditional one. Hindus accepted the evolution of this cultural symbol then. And, as the bindi makes it’s way to the foreheads of non-South Asians, we should accept — even celebrate — the continued evolution of this cultural symbol. Not only has it managed to transcend religion and class in a sea of one-billion brown faces, it will now adorn the faces of many more races. And that’s nothing short of amazing.

So, you won’t find this Hindu posting a flaming tweet accusing a white girl of #culturalappropriation. I will say that I’m glad you find this aspect of my culture beautiful. I do too.

spaceprlncess:

Wish You Were Here album cover outtakes, 1975. Designed by Storm Thorgerson. 

"The album’s cover image was inspired by the idea that people tend to conceal their true feelings, for fear of "getting burned", and thus two businessmen were pictured shaking hands, one man on fire."

spaceprlncess:

Wish You Were Here album cover outtakes, 1975. Designed by Storm Thorgerson. 

"The album’s cover image was inspired by the idea that people tend to conceal their true feelings, for fear of "getting burned", and thus two businessmen were pictured shaking hands, one man on fire."